Dan Stoltman Kremmling’s new town manager begins April 1

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Dan Stoltman
Dan Stoltman

Dan Stoltman has been hired as Kremmling’s new town manager. His salary will begin at $68,000 and after a 90 day review he has the potential to be moved up to $75,000.

Motivated and goal-orientated, Stoltman followed a non-traditional path to become Town Manager.

His family owned a construction company in Milford, Michigan, and Stoltman’s early years were spent on site working as a carpenter. At
the age of 24, he entered Oakland University to pursue his degree in Political Science. He then obtained his Master of Public Administration and a graduate certificate in Public Land Planning and Development Management from Eastern Michigan University. His vast array of experience also includes facilities management and a law clerk assistant.

As he moved into his chosen profession, Stoltman gained experience as a buyer’s assistant for Oakland County Purchasing and Compliance and Assistant City Administrator and Interim Public Works Director in Washburn, Wisconsin. In Washburn, he also served as Parks and Recreation Coordinator.

With a population of over 2000 and “off-the-beaten” path, Washburn has similarities to Kremmling. Stoltman notes Washburn’s main focus has been on housing, economic development and putting itself on the map.

I Want to be at the forefront of what the community wants,” Stoltman stated of his passion for local government and want to make an impact.

In terms of development and economic development, Stoltman commented, “You have to find a way to make conditions as conducive as you can to make people want to come here.”
He also noted the importance of infrastructure, water and sewer to support your goals of retail and housing. Stoltman describes himself as hands-on and explained he would rather see the project than sit in his office and talk about it. “As much as I can get out in the field is a good day for me,” he told the Town Board in his interview.

In Washburn he assisted in the “development and implementation
of 4.8 million dollar annual budget, coordination and management
of capital projects.” He also has experience in administering grants.
Stoltman had many opportunities to hone employee management skills while in Washburn whichemploys 19 staff members. He stresses a cooperative effort built on trust with his department heads and staff.
“It takes all of us to get there,” he highlights of being a part of a cohesive team. “I work hand-in-hand with staff.” He encourages employees to take initiative and bring solutions to problems. For his part, Stoltman will take many of these suggestions and implement them to keep staff motivated. “We have to be prepared to try new things.

We have to allow that open line of communication,” he said.
He commented on the importance of flexibility to accommodate worker’s schedules and the importance of keeping the work environment relaxed.

“You get the best productivity when you have employees who
want to be here,” he said. “You don’t want to be stagnant.”
In contrast, he notes you cannot be afraid to let someone go. “You have to have the power and the will to do what is best for the organization.”

It is a balance, Stoltman explained, “We are working with tax payer dollars and have to be respectful of that and have due diligence
in how that money is spent.”

He recommends department heads attend Town Meetings, but in his interview, questioned the town board’s decision to act as liaisons with the department heads and cautioned it could create communication problems for the staff. Trustees responded to his concerns saying they were open to other possibilities.

“I want to make sure the board has not lost confidence in the town manager position,” Stoltman broached concerns with the board. He also suggested committees for finance and personnel comprised of Town Board members to further communication. “The board and staff should feel comfortable coming to me with problems,” he stressed.

We have to allow that open line of communication,” he said.
He commented on the importance of flexibility to accommodate worker’s schedules and the importance of keeping the work environment relaxed.

“You get the best productivity when you have employees who want to be here,” he said. “You don’t want to be stagnant.”

In contrast, he notes you cannot be afraid to let someone go. “You have to have the power and the will to do what is best for the organization.”

It is a balance, Stoltman explained, “We are working with tax payer dollars and have to be respectful of that and have due diligence in how that money is spent.”

He recommends department heads attend Town Meetings, but in his interview, questioned the town board’s decision to act as liaisons with the department heads and cautioned it could create communication problems for the staff. Trustees responded to his concerns saying they were open to other possibilities.

“I want to make sure the board has not lost confidence in the town manager position,” Stoltman broached concerns with the board. He also suggested committees for finance and personnel comprised of Town Board members to further communication. “The board and staff should feel comfortable coming to me with problems,” he stressed.

The board also asked Stoltman to address code development and enforcement to which he replied,“Codes should reach your goal and be able to be implemented with the staff and expertise you have.”

“Constantly evaluating effectiveness of ordinances and policy… Change
is hard. Policy must address the situation uniformly and fairly… You
have to lay the foundation for compliance,” Stoltman outlines.

His suggestion included communicating the need for the policy and explaining the town is trying to do what is right for the community.
“Approach it in a way that gets it done with the least amount
of resistance,” he stated.

Stoltman has an interest in web development and using social media platforms at the Town. In college, his capstone thesis on the role and effects social media platforms can play in local government. He suggested changes to the website to make information more accessible and utilizing Google analytics to determine who is using the website, what information they are seeking, and how they are finding the information.
“You do everything you can to get that information out there,” Stoltman said and recommended live streaming meetings.

Stoltman will begin his new position on April 1, 2019. His first priority will be getting to know Kremmling, the staff and community members. He also hopes to address, “Little changes that have little cost that can have big impacts.” In Washburn, this was as simple as painting the curbsides.

“You have to find ways to open people’s eyes when they enter our Town. We need to identify the beginning of Town … and grab people’s attention,” he said of putting Kremmling on the map.

He also encouraged further development of trails in Kremmling, “We should use our attributes and start finding ways to expand on what we have and build on it.” He said of what brings people to Kremmling – hunting, outdoor recreation, dirtbiking, rafting, ATVs, snowmobiling.

Stoltman joked in his interview, he had already told his girlfriend moving to Kremmling will force him up begin dirtbiking and snowmobiling again. His girlfriend relocated
to Steamboat Springs earlier.

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