Vesicular Stomatitis Virus confirmed in the county

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photo by Kim Cameron | Middle Park Fairboard president Janet Engel conducts a health inspection of horses as they entered the Kremmling fairgrounds on Tuesday before the 4-H horse show.
photo by Kim Cameron | Middle Park Fairboard president Janet Engel conducts a health inspection of horses as they entered the Kremmling fairgrounds on Tuesday before the 4-H horse show.

Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) has been confirmed in Grand County according to
the Colorado Department of Agriculture website.

The CSU Extension Office was the first to issue a public warning last week at the possibility of the virus in a suspected case. According to the newes release the horse had attended events in Fraser. On Wednesday, the case was confirmed positive. The horse will have to be officially released from its quarantine once its recovery is complete.

The timing of the confirmed case coincides with the Middle Park Fair and Rodeo’s events. 4-H program coordinator, Lacy Stovner encouraged 4-H members to practice healthy sanitation practices.

In an email she explained, “Strict biosecurity measures should be taken, i.e. don’t let your horse make contact with another person’s horse at an event, don’t share water buckets or hay bags, don’t share bits between horses, etc. VSV is known to be spread by flies, so use your fly spray liberally. Keep in mind that stress can trigger an outbreak, so you should carefully consider whether to bring your horses to events.”

Stovner has confirmed that checks will be continued at the gate as horses enter into the arena side
of the fairgrounds. Before entering onto the grounds, a visual inspection of the ears, mouth area and feet will be made on each horse.

VSV is an affliction that primarily affects horse and cattle, but occasionally pigs, sheep and goats. Extreme salivation can be a first symptom along with lack of appetite and weight loss. Other signs become lameness and sloughing of skin on the muzzle, tongue, ears, and coronary bands.

According to the Colorado Department of Agriculture website there has been one confirmed case of vsv in a bovine.

Colorado is among five states in the country to have a confirmed case of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), according to an announcement from the Colorado Department of Agriculture. It is currently in 20 Colorado counties.

Other states affected have been Texas, New Mexico Oklahoma and Wyoming.

For more information about the disease visit these websites.
https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/aganimals/vesicular-stomatitis-virus-vsv

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/cattle-disease-information/vesicular-stomatitis-info

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